The ten most lucrative bus lane cameras in England is one of

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first_imgAccording to the BBC’s research, this has resulted in a combined income of £31m for English councils in 2015-16 – from a total of 1.2m penalties. The figure is likely to be higher as some councils couldn’t break down figures by individual cameras.Drivers in Bradford, Manchester and London are some of the hardest hit. Bradford council alone made £2.3m from bus lane fines in 2015/16. England’s most lucrative bus lane is on the northbound section of John Dobson Street. It is based in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, a council that made over £1m from bus lane fines in 2015/16. Between 23 February and 31 October 2016, this single camera issued 62,975 penalty charge notices, making a total of £1.5m – or £5,960 from an average 250 fines every day.The council was forced to give refunds to some motorists impacted by this camera in its first two months of use, after it was found that signs for “inadequately lit” at night.Currently, fines for driving in bus lanes in England stand at: Greater London: £130 but £65 if paid within 14 daysOutside London: £65 but £30 if early payment is made Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Bus lane cameras in England took 31m from motorists in 2015-16, fining almost 4,000 motorists per day.The most lucrative camera in the county makes £6,000 every day, according to BBC freedom of information requests to 160 authorities responsible for highways in England, 64 of whom had bus lane cameras.The worst 10 cameras for catching drivers are centred in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Manchester and London. Councils told the BBC that cameras are clearly signed and that they expect income to fall as drivers begin to avoid bus lanes in the future.last_img read more

Put down your smartphones to make it a family Christmas

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first_imgExplaining how even the best parents can struggle to manage their children’s “screen time”, she writes how many social media sites actually replicate the most normal and natural forms of offline communication and game playing. And, she says, Christmas is the ideal time to celebrate family life and the chance for parents and their children to enjoy a digital free time.“I think we are in real danger of losing something really special if children’s play becomes exclusively about playing online games on their own,” she writes. “So Christmas Day is the perfect opportunity to sit down together and play together as a family. Board games are quite a novelty for a lot of children and they will soon find the conversations and family banter they encourage is fun.”Mrs Longfield notes how many computer games or apps are actually based on more traditional forms of children’s entertainment that require youngsters’ to use their imagination and creativity.“If children are going to use tablets and smartphones, encourage them to do more than passively consume. In many ways, games like Minecraft are digital versions of Lego and Meccano,” she says.However, in her Digital Five a Day, she encourages families to turn off their electronic devices and indulge in the art of conversation, be more active by heading outdoors over the festive season, be creative and embrace the way the spirit of Christmas is about giving. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Finally, she urges parents to teach children how to be aware of the way and how often they use the internet so they are better able to spot signs when they are becoming dependent or using it in an unhealthy way.  “Encourage them to come up with ways of managing the time they spend online themselves and appreciating the time they spend offline more. Use apps that helps them to switch off. Set an example yourself by not spending every spare Christmas moment on your own phone.”She concludes: “The toys and gadgets children want from Santa change every year, though smartphones and tablets look here to stay.“What I hope will never change are the fundamentals of a childhood Christmas. Playing and spending time together, interacting with each other, sharing activities, giving to others and being mindful of others should all still be at the heart of every child’s Christmas, even in today’s digital world.”center_img Parents should set an example this Christmas by putting down their mobile phones and tablets to play board games and interact in the real world with their children, the Children’s Commissioner for England and Wales says.Anne Longfield claims youngsters’ increasing obsession with the internet and virtual reality means many of them see traditional games as a “novelty”, and are consequently missing out on the pleasures of conversation and family banter.Drawing up a “Digital Five a Day” for children’s mental health similar to the NHS five a day dietary requirements for physical wellbeing, she urges families to embrace the art of conversation, activity, creativity, charity and mindfulness.Mrs Longfield warns how many families are facing a “digital Christmas” with children glued to tablets, smartphones and the internet with its myriad of social media websites only emerging from their screens to eat. Comparing the virtual world to junk food, she claims that parents owe children more than a mere digital diet this festive season.She says: “We need to pay the same attention to our children’s digital diets as we do to the food they eat. We wouldn’t allow them to eat a double cheeseburger every day and we shouldn’t be happy to leave them to set their own digital diet. If we want to make sure the time children do spend online is healthy and productive, parents must take responsibility.”last_img read more

David Walliams is biggest selling author of 2017

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first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. David Walliams was the biggest-selling author of 2017, overtaking JK Rowling with sales of more than £16 million from his children’s books.The writer and television presenter outsold fellow children’s authors Julia Donaldson and Philip Pullman, thriller writers James Patterson and Dan Brown, and TV chefs Jamie Oliver and Mary Berry.Walliams published his first book for children in 2008 and has been billed as the successor to Roald Dahl. His two most recent books, The World’s Worst Children and Bad Dad, helped boost his sales by almost 20 per cent on the previous year.He sold £16.57 million worth of books in 2017. Rowling came second in the list with sales of £15.47 million, as readers continued to lap up her Harry Potter books. Donaldson was third with sales of £14.65 million, followed by Jamie Oliver on £11.44 million and Lee Child on £7.5 million.The figures, compiled by Nielsen BookScan and published by The Bookseller, also showed that women dominated literary fiction sales last year.Nine out of the 10 best-selling literary authors were female, with Haruki Murakami the only male.Margaret Atwood topped the list with sales of £2.76 million, boosted by the Netflix adaptation of her dystopian novel, The Handmaid’s Tale. David Walliams at the launch of his 2014 book Awful AuntieCredit:Tim P Whitby/Getty Imagescenter_img David Walliams at the launch of his 2014 book Awful Auntie Helen Dunmore, who died last summer, was second in the list, followed by Sarah Perry, author of the runaway bestseller The Essex Serpent.Naomi Alderman, Elena Ferrante, Ali Smith, Zadie Smith, Maggie O’Farrell and Arundhati Roy completed the top 10, edging out Julian Barnes, Ian McEwan and the Nobel Prize winner, Kazuo Ishiguro.last_img read more

Stop referring to Middle Ages as Dark Ages because it was an

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Visitors can see the original Beowulf manuscriptCredit:British Library Examples of expert craftmanship are on showCredit:Ashmolean Museum It is popularly held as a period when Britain and the rest of the world fell into a deep decline.But according to the British Library, the Dark Ages were anything but. The curator of a new exhibition has suggested the term unfairly maligns a time of great creativity and enlightened thinking.Dr Claire Breay said that objects in the “once-in-a-generation” exhibition, which opens on Friday, show that Britain was sophisticated and pioneering. –– ADVERTISEMENT ––She told The Telegraph: “I think people always think of this time as the Dark Ages. “We are trying to show the public and encourage them to engage with the literary and artistic evidence of the [Anglo-Saxon peoples’] complex and sophisticated lives.”At the time, she said, Britain lead the world in areas such as poetry, shown by texts like Beowulf, medicine, and organisation of land and taxes, which is shown by the Domesday Book. British Library Displayed together for the first time are outstanding illuminated and decorated manuscripts, spanning six centuries from the eclipse of Roman Britain in the 5th century to the Norman Conquest of 1066. The intricate jewels worn by the rich can also be seen, with a notable example being the bright Alfred Jewel, surrounded by delicate gold carvings. Britain’s literary tradition is also on display; four principal manuscripts of Old English poetry are shown together for the first time, with the British Library’s unique manuscript of Beowulf displayed alongside the Vercelli Book returning to England for the first time from the Biblioteca Capitolare in Vercelli; the Exeter Book, and the Junius Manuscript.Visitors can also see music scores written for horns to be played centuries ago, displayed alongside an original instrument.There are many firsts to see in the exhibition; from the first political biography of a woman, to the first English letter.Dr Breay added: “This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to see an outstanding array of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts and objects produced over six centuries, which demonstrate the sophistication and interconnected European world of Anglo-Saxon art, literature and history.” Examples of expert craftmanship are on show Dr Breay added: “That’s what made Britain so attractive for other countries to invade – it was prosperous and well-organised.“The exhibition shows many examples of just how sophisticated our literary tradition was.“Not only that but the Domesday Book shows the degree of the administrative sophistication we had.”Many of the objects show expert craftsmanship which has stood the test of time, most notably the brightly-decorated manuscripts which still glow and gleam in their original coloured ink. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Secondary school league tables White children are least likely to achieve their

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A school’s Progress 8 score measures progress of each pupil from the end of primary school up to GCSEs  It compares pupils’ results with the achievements of other pupils that have the same prior attainment and measures performance across eight qualifications at age 16.The average progress score is zero, so a positive score means pupils are making above average progress and a negative score means below average. This year, the average Progress 8 score for white children in state schools was the lowest at -0.10, compared to -0.02 for mixed race, 0.45 for Asian, 0.12 for black and 1.03 for Chinese pupils. White children has the second lowest score for attainment, with an average of 46.1.Chinese pupils had the highest score of 64.2, followed by Asian children, while black children had the lowest. Both this year and last, children with English as a second language had a higher score for attainment and made better progress on average than native speakers. The data, which covers every secondary in England, shows that Yorkshire and the Humber has the lowest proportion of under-performing schools while the North West had the highest. Over a quarter (26 per cent) of all the under-performing schools in England are in the North-West, figures show. The figures also show that the attainment gap between rich and poor pupils has increased by 0.6 per cent since last year, but has narrowed by 9.5 per cent overall since 2011.Schools minister Nick Gibb said: “Making sure that all pupils, regardless of their background, are able to fulfil their potential is one of this Government’s key priorities and these results show that more pupils across the country are doing just that.  “It’s been clear for some time that standards are rising in our schools and today’s data underlines the role academies and free schools are playing in that improvement, with progress above the national average and impressive outcomes for disadvantaged pupils.” White children are the least likely to achieve their potential between primary and secondary school, official data shows.Official data released by the Department for Education (DfE) shows that white children are making less progress compared to their peers from all other ethnic groups by the time they are 16-years-old.The figures also show that 346 secondary schools are considered under-performing, meaning they fall below the “floor standard”, with another 257 deemed to be “coasting”.These numbers appear to be an improvement – however, this year ministers have excluded University Technical Colleges (UTCs), further education colleges and studio schools from their calculations.These tend to specialise in vocational and technical qualifications and generally perform worse than mainstream schools.When these are also excluded from last year’s data set, figures show that the number of below average schools has gone up, from 8.9 per cent to 9.2 per cent for coasting schools and from 10.4 per cent to 11.6 per cent for schools that fail to meet the floor standard.    In previous years, schools have been ranked according to the proportion of pupils achieving at least five grade A* to Cs at GCSE, including English and maths. This measure was scrapped two years ago in favour of a new system that measures progress as well as attainment. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Teenager denies raping and killing sixyearold Alesha MacPhail

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alesha macphail toni mclachlan Toni McLachlan has denied having anything to do with Alesha’s deathCredit:PA The teenager, who gave evidence for more than two hours, told the court he saw Ms McLachlan in the early hours of that morning after she asked if he wanted to meet for a cigarette. A teenage boy has claimed he is the victim of an “extraordinarily wicked” plan to frame him for the rape and murder of six-year-old Alesha MacPhail.The 16-year-old, who cannot be named because of his age, said he had never met Alesha and never knew her name before her body was found on July 2 last year.Giving evidence on his own behalf at the High Court in Glasgow, after the prosecution closed its case, he told the jury: “I would never do something like that.”He denies abducting, raping and killing the schoolgirl and has lodged a special defence blaming the crime on 18-year-old Toni McLachlan, the girlfriend of the victim’s father Robert MacPhail.The body of the schoolgirl, who died from significant pressure being applied to her face and neck, was discovered in a wooded area on the Isle of Bute.The court heard earlier on Tuesday that DNA found on Alesha’s body matched the teenager, with odds of more than a billion to one that it came from another person.He claims in his defence that he had sex with Mc McLachlan on July 2 and that she must have taken a condom he used and planted his DNA at the scene. He said he had previously had sex “fairly frequently” with her in late 2017, despite her being in a relationship with Mr MacPhail, and that he had previously bought cannabis from them.He claimed the pair started chatting that morning, before having sex again in a lock-up garage.The court heard earlier that Alesha was found at 8.54am later that morning in the grounds of the former Kyles Hydro Hotel on Bute.Asked by Brian McConnachie QC, defending, if he had sex with the schoolgirl, he said: “Absolutely not. I have never met Alesha in person. I did not even know her name.”He claimed he could “speculate” as to how his DNA could be at the murder scene, adding: “I cannot think of any other way that it could get on Alesha…that Toni took the condom when I left and just went and killed Alesha.”Iain McSporran QC, prosecuting, branded the boy a “confident liar” and asked him why Ms McLachlan would want to implicate him in the murder. The boy told the court: “I agree.”The prosecutor also told the teenager that Ms McLachlan would have taken a “big risk” to have met him that morning before returning to the home she shared with Mr MacPhail and his family to get Alesha.The boy said: “I cannot think of how else she would have done it.”Mr McSporran told him: “Someone brutalised Alesha MacPhail. It is either you or Toni McLachlan.”He replied: “Not me, absolutely not. I would never do something like that.”The trial continues. Robert MacPhail, Alesha’s father, at the High Court in GlasgowCredit:Getty The teenager replied: “To get away with it. Maybe she is mad at me for something.”Mr McSporran said: “So, she had murder in mind and would fit someone up. Someone, you say, she had sex with, someone she got on with. If that is right that makes her an extraordinarily wicked person?” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Family of teenager fatally stabbed by his friend launch legal challenge against

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The family of a teenager fatally stabbed by his friend have launched a legal challenge against the “unduly lenient” sentence he received.Yousef Makki, 17, died after being knifed in the heart in Hale Barns, Greater Manchester, on March 2.The teenager who dealt the fatal blow, referred to as Boy A for legal reasons, admitted perverting the course of justice and possession of a knife, and was found not guilty of murder and manslaughter.He was handed a 16-month detention and training order and will spend half of that period in custody.Another 17-year-old, known as Boy B, also admitted possessing a knife and was given a four-month detention and training order. He will also serve half of that sentence in custody.Yousef’s family is now appealing to the Attorney General, Geoffrey Cox QC, for the “unduly lenient” sentences to be increased.They wrote in legal submissions: “Public concern at the increase in knife crime must be reflected in the sentences imposed.”A sentence of 16-months did not reflect the overall criminality involving Boy A.”So far as Boy B is concerned, for substantially the same reasons as identified in relation to Boy A, the sentence imposed was unduly lenient.”Yousef’s sister Jade added: “We believe that these sentences do not send the right message to society. Knife crime is at its highest at the moment and we need tougher sentencing.” On the day of the murder, Boy A lied to police that Yousef had been stabbed by someone who fled the scene by car. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A schoolboy pays his respects to Yousef outside Manchester Grammar School This meant he was treated as a witness rather than a suspect and wasted valuable police resources, crown court judge Mr Justice Simon Bryan QC previously said.During sentencing, the judge said Boy A “found knives cool”, videoed himself with them and listened to drill music and gangster rap which “glorified” the carrying and use of blades.Last month a disturbing video emerged showing Boy A making stabbing gestures as drill music referring to “blades” and “shanks” – slang for “knives” – plays in the background.The footage, seen by The Telegraph, is believed to have been filmed in a toilet cubicle at Manchester Crown Court during the trial while the teenager was on bail.The video ended up being sent to Yousef’s family, who then sent it to the judge presiding over the case.Detectives are investigating if the person who sent it to the family have committed an offence under the Malicious Communications Act.Yousef, who had dreamed of becoming a heart surgeon, had won a scholarship to the prestigious Manchester Grammar School before his death. A schoolboy pays his respects to Yousef outside Manchester Grammar SchoolCredit:Mercury Press & Media/Mercury Press & Media read more

Cabinets role should end with PPC in place – PAC

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Public Accounts Committee (PAC) Chairman Irfaan Ali said there was absolutely no space for Cabinet to give its “no objections” to contracts once the Public Procurement Commission (PPC) was in place.He said the PPC has complete oversight responsibility of the procurement process, something Cabinet should have relinquished once the Commission was established.Irfaan Ali“What I know is that once the PPC comes into operation, which is the position right now, there is absolutely no role for the Cabinet. The Cabinet cannot give any “no objection”; it cannot be involved in any aspect of procurement. The Commission has complete oversight responsibility of the procurement process,” Ali was quoted as saying in the Guyana Times.Following an announcement by the recently-established PPC, Government had come in for criticism for “overstepping its grounds”, by being involved in the issuance of public contracts although the Commission was established for this purpose. The Commission, coming out in rebuttal of accusations made against it, laid out on Friday that it did not have within its remit, giving “no objections” to contracts, although Government said that would be one of its major responsibilities.On Friday, the PPC, in response to reports in the media, sought to clear up the “misconceptions” about its real functions as a recently-established procurement body. According to the PPC, recent media reports have contributed to the notion that it had not yet commenced its work, resulting in the continuing role of Cabinet in the national procurement system, whereby it issues its “no objection” to the award of contracts.However, the body said that since its establishment in October last, it has been carrying out some basic preliminary work, required by the Constitution before it could begin carrying out its mandate, which incidentally does not include the granting of “no objections” to contracts.They included the election of a chairperson; followed by discussions with the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) on the benefits and conditions of service for the Commissioners; and the determination of a staff structure for the establishment of a Secretariat, including the preparation of the terms and conditions of the proposed staff, of which the three principal officers require the approval of the National Assembly”.It said in pursuit of this mandate, Commissioners have been meeting almost daily, and in the absence of a fixed office.It continued that following a detailed review of the applicable legislative framework, it engaged several stakeholders within the national procurement system to sensitise them to the role and functions of the PPC. In this regard, members of the Commission said it interfaced and held discussions with more than 100 public officials from several agencies and departments that function in the public procurement system and deal directly with procurement matters.Earlier this month, Minister of State, Joseph Harmon said that PPC was still inactive as it still was in the process of recruiting competent employees, and Cabinet would stop granting its no-objection when the PPC was ready to work.“Once they say to us ‘we are ready to function’, then Cabinet will cease doing anything, but since these are public infrastructural projects that need to be executed, we cannot just sit and wait,” the Minister of State posited.“Once the PPC indicates that they are ready, and then Cabinet will pull back,” he emphasised. Harmon also admitted that though the PPC has been inactive, the Commissioners have been receiving their salaries.Reports indicate that PPC Chairperson Carol Corbin is receiving $1.3 million monthly, while the other Commissioners are earning some $900,000 per month.The other Commissioners are Nanda Gopaul, Emily Dodson, Ivor English, and Sukrishnalall Pasha. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedProcurement commission hints Cabinet might continue offering ‘no-objection’ to contractsFebruary 24, 2017In “latest news”Govt. buckles under pressure: Defers Procurement Amendment Bill after extensive debateDecember 19, 2013In “Politics”TIGI slams Govt for approving Public Health contract to blacklisted companyAugust 30, 2017In “Business”,Public Accounts Committee (PAC) Chairman Irfaan Ali said there was absolutely no space for Cabinet to give its “no objections” to contracts once the Public Procurement Commission (PPC) was in place.He said the PPC has complete oversight responsibility of the procurement process, something Cabinet should have relinquished once the Commission was established.Irfaan Ali“What I know is that once the PPC comes into operation, which is the position right now, there is absolutely no role for the Cabinet. The Cabinet cannot give any “no objection”; it cannot be involved in any aspect of procurement. The Commission has complete oversight responsibility of the procurement process,” Ali was quoted as saying in the Guyana Times.Following an announcement by the recently-established PPC, Government had come in for criticism for “overstepping its grounds”, by being involved in the issuance of public contracts although the Commission was established for this purpose. The Commission, coming out in rebuttal of accusations made against it, laid out on Friday that it did not have within its remit, giving “no objections” to contracts, although Government said that would be one of its major responsibilities.On Friday, the PPC, in response to reports in the media, sought to clear up the “misconceptions” about its real functions as a recently-established procurement body. According to the PPC, recent media reports have contributed to the notion that it had not yet commenced its work, resulting in the continuing role of Cabinet in the national procurement system, whereby it issues its “no objection” to the award of contracts.However, the body said that since its establishment in October last, it has been carrying out some basic preliminary work, required by the Constitution before it could begin carrying out its mandate, which incidentally does not include the granting of “no objections” to contracts.They included the election of a chairperson; followed by discussions with the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) on the benefits and conditions of service for the Commissioners; and the determination of a staff structure for the establishment of a Secretariat, including the preparation of the terms and conditions of the proposed staff, of which the three principal officers require the approval of the National Assembly”.It said in pursuit of this mandate, Commissioners have been meeting almost daily, and in the absence of a fixed office.It continued that following a detailed review of the applicable legislative framework, it engaged several stakeholders within the national procurement system to sensitise them to the role and functions of the PPC. In this regard, members of the Commission said it interfaced and held discussions with more than 100 public officials from several agencies and departments that function in the public procurement system and deal directly with procurement matters.Earlier this month, Minister of State, Joseph Harmon said that PPC was still inactive as it still was in the process of recruiting competent employees, and Cabinet would stop granting its no-objection when the PPC was ready to work.“Once they say to us ‘we are ready to function’, then Cabinet will cease doing anything, but since these are public infrastructural projects that need to be executed, we cannot just sit and wait,” the Minister of State posited.“Once the PPC indicates that they are ready, and then Cabinet will pull back,” he emphasised. Harmon also admitted that though the PPC has been inactive, the Commissioners have been receiving their salaries.Reports indicate that PPC Chairperson Carol Corbin is receiving $1.3 million monthly, while the other Commissioners are earning some $900,000 per month.The other Commissioners are Nanda Gopaul, Emily Dodson, Ivor English, and Sukrishnalall Pasha. read more

Mazaruni Prison upgrade moving apace Samuels

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Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedMazaruni Prison Expansion works ongoingJuly 16, 2017In “Local News”60 steel cells to be constructed at Camp StreetJuly 6, 2018In “Crime”See your incarceration as your opportunity to get right back up – Director of PrisonsDecember 19, 2017In “Crime” Acting Director of Prisons, Gladwin Samuels, providing an update on the expansion of the Mazaruni Prison said that twelve of the living quarters earmarked for prison staff at the institution have been completed and a further eight are set for completion this year.An aerial view of the houses being constructed at the Mazaruni Prison“Twelve houses were constructed last year and an additional eight will be constructed in 2018. Last weekend the advertisement went out for the first four of the eight houses, the tenders are supposed to be open this week so more than likely the contract would be awarded soon” he noted.In an interview with the DPI, Samuels noted that along with the completed twelve houses, the installation of its new generator in 2017 and prospective solar panels in 2018, the Guyana Prison Service (GPS) also plans to increase the number of hours during which electricity is provided on the island facility.This, Samuels said, will not only make the officers’ stay a more comfortable one, but will also aid its electronic surveillance security system and increase the opportunities for its skills training programme.“It will increase our ability to be able to offer skill training to prisoners because most skill training requires power tools and it restricted the capacity of the prison to offer training in carpentry and other such areas that would require the use of power tools when power was not adequately available. We are also looking at the installation of solar panels which will also complement the generators especially for our CCTV expansion which will be part of our 2018 project as well.”Midair view of the area designated for the prison’s constructionAccording to Samuels, these upgrades are in keeping with the budget request of the GPS and the recommendations from the Commission of Inquiry (CoI).In the 2018 National Budget, the sum of $1.5 billion has been allocated to the GPS, a sizeable amount of which will go towards continuing the expansion of the prison with construction of a new brick wing to house an additional 400 inmates.  The penitentiary currently houses 452. read more

CoaltoLiquids favoured by tax breaks in the USA

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first_imgIn America, the Senate Finance Committee has unanimously approved an amendment offered by Senators Jim Bunning (R-Ky.) and Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) that extends until 2010 a critical alternative fuels tax credit that will help accelerate the production of clean, domestic coal-to-liquid (CTL) fuels. Finance Committee members approved adding the CTL tax credit amendment on October 4 to a larger tax package primarily focused on aiding the reauthorization of federal agricultural support programs. The amendment extends an existing 50% per gallon fuel excise tax credit for CTL until 2010 and requires CTL producers to capture and store 50% of carbon dioxide emissions. CTL producers could be required to capture and store 75% of carbon dioxide emissions should an independent arbitration panel determine that such a level is commercially feasible. Without an extension, the tax credit, created by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, is set to expire in September 2009.National Mining Association President and CEO Kraig R. Naasz: “Looking forward, the CTLC (Coal-To-Liquids Coalition) will continue working with all Senate CTL supporters to ensure this tax credit extension is signed into law.”last_img read more